Leg-Feet Problems

Leg-Feet Problems (3)

US Chiropractic Directory Presents:

Leg-Feet Problems


Leg and feet problems are a significant issues that people worldwide suffer from. Chiropractic has been safely and effectively helping patents with pain in the legs and feet for over 100 years and The US Chiropractic Directory has create a forum of information involving the entire healthcare and scientific community to bring the public evidenced and researched based answers on how and why chiropractic works to help those with leg and feet pain/problems.

Disc Surgery (Discectomy,) Sciatica (Leg Pain) & Lumbar Disc Herniation

Surgery vs. Chiropractic Care

 

A report on the scientific literature 


by

Mark Studin DC, FASBE(C), DAAPM, DAAMLP

 

60% of Surgical Candidates Avoid Surgery with Chiropractic

 

According to a group at MayoClinic.com (2010), "Sciatica refers to pain that radiates along the path of the sciatic nerve and its branches — from your back down your buttock and leg. The sciatic nerve is the longest nerve in your body. It runs from your spinal cord to your buttock and hip area and down the back of each leg. Sciatica is a symptom, not a disorder. The radiating pain of sciatica signals another problem involving the nerve, such as a herniated disk" (http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/ sciatica/DS00516).

Sciatica symptoms include: Pain "…likely to occur along a path from your low back to your buttock and the back of your thigh and calf. Numbness or muscle weakness along the nerve pathway in your leg or foot. In some cases, you may have pain in one part of your leg and numbness in another. Tingling or a pins-and-needles feeling, often in your toes or part of your foot. A loss of bladder or bowel control. This is a sign of cauda equina syndrome, a serious condition that requires emergency care" (Mayo Clinic Staff, 2010, http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sciatica/DS00516/DSECTION=symptoms).

A prime symptom of sciatica is leg pain in conjunction with herniated discs. As reported by the US Chiropractic Directory in 2010, "Pain radiating down your leg secondary to a herniated disc is a common and often disabling occurrence. A disc in your spine is comprised of 2 basic components, the inner nucleus pulposis that is gelatinous in composition and the outer annulus fibrosis that is fibro-cartilaginous and very strong. When a person experiences trauma and the forces are directed at the spine and disc. The pressure on the inside of the disc is increased (like stepping on a balloon) and the internal nucleus pulposis creates pressure from the inside out. It tears the outer annulus fibrosis causing the internal material to go beyond the outer boundaries of the disc. This has often been misnamed a ‘slipped disc’ because the disc doesn’t slip or slide, it is torn from the trauma allowing the internal material to escape.
 
Conversely, a bulging disc, which gets confused with a herniated disc, is a degenerative "wear and tear scenario" that occurs over time with the annulus fibrosis degenerating. This can also be a "risk factor" allowing the disc to herniate with less trauma due to the degeneration or thinning of the disc walls. This, however, is a conversation for another article.
 
Lifetime prevalence of a herniated disc has been estimated to be 35% in men and 45% in woman and it has been estimated that 90% of all leg pain secondary to herniated discs occurs at either the L4-5 or L5-S1 levels. It has also been reported that average duration of symptoms is 55.9 weeks, underscoring the critical necessity for finding a viable solution for these patients" (
http://www.uschirodirectory.com/index.php/patient-information/item/235-herniated-discs-radiating-pain-and-chiropractic).

It was reported by McMorland, Suter, Casha, du Plessis, and Hurlbert in 2010 that over 250,000 patients a year undergo elective lumbar discectomy (spinal surgery) for the treatment of low back disc issues in the United States. The researchers did a comparative randomized clinical study comparing spinal microdiscectomy (surgery) performed by neurosurgeons to non-operative manipulative treatments (chiropractic adjustments) performed by chiropractors. They compared quality of life and disabilities of the patients in the study.

This study was limited to patients with distinct one-sided lumbar disc herniations as diagnosed via MRI and had associated radicular (nerve root) symptoms. Based upon the authors’ review of available MRI studies, the patients participating in the study were all initially considered surgical candidates.

Both the surgical and chiropractic groups reported no new neurological problems surfaced and had only minor post-treatment soreness. 60% of the patients who underwent chiropractic care reported a successful outcome while 40% required surgery and of those 40%, all reported successful outcomes. Of those patients choosing surgery as the primary means of treatment, 15% reported a failed surgical outcome and then chose chiropractic as a secondary choice. Of those 15% with failed surgeries, all were reported to have performed worse in clinical outcomes.

While it is clear that an accurate diagnosis could dictate that many patients require immediate surgery, many also do not. The above study indicates that a conservative non-operative approach of chiropractic care prevented 60% from needless surgery. While a larger study would give us more information, based upon the outcomes, cost factors and potential increased risks of surgery, it was concluded that chiropractic is a viable, first line treatment option.

These studies along with many others conclude that a drug-free approach of chiropractic care is one of the best solutions for patients with surgical lumbar discs and sciatic pain. To find a qualified doctor of chiropractic near you go to the US Chiropractic Directory at www.USChiroDirectory.com and search your state.

References:

1. Mayo Clinic Staff. (2010, April 22). Sciatica, Definition. MayoClinic.com, Retrieved from, http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sciatica/DS00516

2. Mayo Clinic Staff. (2010, April 22). Sciatica, Symptoms. MayoClinic.com, Retrieved from http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/sciatica/DS00516/DSECTION=symptoms

3. Studin, M. (2010). Herniated discs, radiating pain and chiropractic. US Chiropractic Directory. Retrieved from http://www.uschirodirectory.com/index.php/patient-information/item/235-herniated-discs-radiating-pain-and-chiropractic

4. McMorland, G., Suter, E., Casha, S., du Plessis, S. J., & Hurlbert, R. J. (2010). Manipulation or microdiskectomy for sciatica? A prospective randomized clinical study. Journal of Manipulative and Physiological Therapeutics, 33 (8), 576-584

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Back and Leg Pain (Lumbar Radiculopathy)  as a Result of Disc Herniation and the Long Term Effect of Chiropractic Care


90% of all low back-lumbar disc herniation patients got better with chiropractic care

A report on the scientific literature 



By

Mark Studin DC, FASBE (C), DAAPM, DAAMLP
 

The term "herniated disc" has been called many things from a slipped disc to a bulging disc. For a doctor who specializes in disc problems, the term is critical because it tells him/her how to create a prognosis and subsequent treatment plan for a patient. To clarify the disc issue, a herniated disc is where a disc tears and the internal material of the disc, called the nucleus pulposis, extends through that tear. It is always results from trauma or an accident. A bulging disc is a degenerative "wear and tear" phenomenon where the internal material or nucleus pulposis does not extend through the disc because there has been no tear, but the walls of the disc have been thinned from degeneration and the internal disc material creates pressure with thinned external walls. The disc itself "spreads out" or bulges.

There are various forms and degrees of disc issues, but the biggest concern of the specialist is whether nerves are being affected that can cause significant pain or other problems. The problem exists when the disc, as a result of a herniation or bulge, is touching or compressing those neurological elements, which is comprised of either the spinal cord, the nerve root (a nerve the extends from the spinal cord) or the covering of the nerves, called the thecal sac.

With regard to the structure that we have just discussed, the doctor must wonder what the herniation of the neurological element has caused. In this scenario, there are 2 possible problems, the spinal cord and nerve root. If the disc has compromised the spinal cord, it is called a myelopathy (my-e-lo-pathy). You have a compression of the spinal cord and problems with your arms or legs. An immediate visit to the neurosurgeon is warranted for a surgical consultation. The second problem is when the disc is effecting the spinal nerve root, called a radiculopathy. It is a very common problem. A doctor of chiropractic experienced in treating radiculopathy has to determine if there is enough room between the disc and the nerve in order to determine if a surgical consultation is warranted or if he/she can safely treat you. This is done by a thorough clinical examination and in many cases, an MRI is required to make a final diagnosis. Most patients do not need a surgical consultation and can be safely treated by an experienced chiropractor.

While herniations can occur anywhere, it was reported by
Jordan, Konstanttinou, & O'Dowd (2009)  that 95% occur in the lower back.  "The highest prevalence is among people aged 30–50 years, with a male to female ratio of 2:1. In people aged 25–55 years, about 95% of herniated discs occur at the lower lumbar spine (L4/5 and L5/S1 level); disc herniation above this level is more common in people aged over 55 years" (http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/ceweb/conditions/msd/1118/1118_background.jsp#incidence).

It was reported by Aspegren et al. (2009) that 80% of the chiropractic patients studied with both neck and low back (cervical and lumbar) disc herniations had a good clinical outcome with post-care visual analog scores under 2 [0 to 10 with 0 being no pain and 10 being the worst pain imaginable] and resolution of abnormal clinical examination findings. Anatomically, after repeat MRI scans, 63% of the patients studied revealed a reduced size or completely resorbed disc herniation. A study by Murphy, Hurwitz, and McGovern (2009) focused only on low back (lumbar) disc herniations and concluded that, "Nearly 90% of patients reported their outcome to be either 'excellent' or 'good'...clinically meaningful improvement in pain intensity was seen in 74% of patients (p. 729)." The researchers also concluded that the improvements from chiropractic care was maintained for 14 1/2 months, the length of the study, indicating this isn't a temporary, but a long-term solution. It was reported by BenEliyahu (1996) that 78% percent of the low back-lumbar disc herniation patients were able to return to work in their pre-disability occupations, which is the result of the 90% of all low back-lumbar disc herniation patients getting better with chiropractic care as discussed above.

These are the reasons that chiropractic has been, and needs to be, considered for the primary care for low back-lumbar disc herniations with resultant pain in the back or legs.
This study along with many others concludes that a drug-free approach of chiropractic care is one of the best solutions for herniated discs and low back or leg pain. To find a qualified doctor of chiropractic near you go to the US Chiropractic Directory at www.USChiroDirectory.com and search your state.




References:

1. Jordan, J., Konstanttinou, K., & O'Dowd, J. (2009, March 26). Herniated lumbar disc. Clinical Evidence. Retrieved from http://clinicalevidence.bmj.com/ceweb/conditions/msd/1118/1118_background.jsp#incidence
2. Aspegren, D., Enebo, B. A., Miller, M., White, L., Akuthota, V., Hyde, T. E., & Cox, J. M. (2009). Functional scores and subjective responses of injured workers with back or neck pain treated with chiropractic care in an integrative program: A retrospective analysis of 100 cases. Journal Manipulative Physiological Therapy 32(9), 765-771.
3. Murphy, D. R., Hurwitz, E. L., & McGovern, E. E. (2009). A nonsurgical approach to the management of patients with lumbar radiculopathy secondary to herniated disk: A prospective observational cohort study with follow-up. Journal Manipulative Physiological Therapy, (32)9, 723-733.

4. BenEliyahu, D. J. (1996). Magnetic resonance imaging and clinical follow-up: Study of 27 patients receiving chiropractic care for cervical and lumbar disc herniations. Journal Manipulative Physiological Therapy, 19(9), 597-606.

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Monday, 19 April 2010 00:19

Hip, Knee, Ankle and Foot Problems

Written by

Hip, Knee, Ankle and Foot Problems

A report on the scientific literature 


By
William J. Owens DC, DAAMLP
Mark Studin DC, FASBE(C), DAAPM, DAAMLP
 
*in this paper, we are listing research to help the public to understand that what chiropractors do correlates with the scientific evidence.
Just as it is less common for patients to know that chiropractors treat the arms and hands, it is equally common for people to miss that the hip, knee, ankle and foot also fall under chiropractic care. In a recent study published in 2009 by Brantingham et al, 2009, the authors reviewed all the research to date that was relevant to chiropractic and treatment of the hips, knee, ankle and foot. The research is growing at an incredible rate and is an important part of chiropractic’s role in healthcare. 
 
The authors reported “The data demonstrate that most chiropractors, based upon their professional training, routinely diagnose and treat extremity conditions” (p54). They also state “Extremity treatment is the second most frequently applied procedure within the chiropractic profession, with 76.1% reportedly using spinal and extremity procedures as compared with 18.7% who limit their practice to the spine only”. (p54). 
 
The following chart will help you to see what conditions fell under the review of this research paper and how many studies there were related to a specific condition.
 
Condition
Responded to Chiropractic Care
Study Name and Date
Hip Osteoarthritis
YES
Hoeksma et al 2004
Brantingham et al 2003
MacDonald et al 2006
Knee Osteoarthritis
YES
Deyle et al 2000
Deyle et al 2005
Tucker et al 2003
Moss et al 2007
Hillerman et al 2006
Cliborne et al 2004
Currier et al 2007
Ankle Sprain
YES
Pellow and Brantingham 2001
Green et al 2001
Coetzer et al 2001
Eisenhart et al 2003
Collins et al 2004
Vicenzino et al 2006
Lopez-Rodriquez et al 2007
Kohne et al 2007
Plantar Facitis
YES
Dimou et al 2004
Metatarsalgia (pain in the foot)
YES
Peterson et al 2003
Govender et al 2007
Big Toe Pain
YES
Shamus et al 2004
Brantingham et al 2005
 
 
The authors concluded “Overall, when reviewing the increasing quantity and quality of included trials, manual therapy [Chiropractic adjustment] for lower extremity disorders appears to be of value and fundamentally safe”. (p66).
 
When it comes to your health, nothing is more important than your nervous system. That is why doctors of chiropractic will always screen your spine for evidence of Vertebral Subluxation while they are attending to problems in other areas of your body. If you are suffering with problems in your hips, knees, ankles or feet, chiropractic care has been show to have positive effects on symptoms and function. Consult with a local doctor of chiropractic today, you’ll be glad you did.
 
1.       James W. Brantingham, DC, PhD, Gary Globe, DG, MBA, PhD, Henry Pollard, DG,Marian Hicks, MSLS, Gharmaine Korporaal, MTech:Chiropractic and Wayne Hoskins, BGhSc, MGhiro MANIPULATIVE THERAPY FOR LOWER EXTREMITY CONDITIONS: EXPANSION OF LITERATURE REVIEW. J Manipulative Physiol Ther 2009;32:53-71.

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